REVIEW: MUSE – THE 2ND LAW


As a lifelong fan of Muse (Muse, as in Showbiz, Origin of Symmetry and Absolution, Muse), I’m potentially the wrong person to review the English trio’s 6th studio release, The 2nd Law. This in itself is a sad fact, that the announcement of a new Muse album this autumn filled me with dread rather than hope. But here it goes; my progressing track-by-track thoughts on my listen through of the album that has broken all Has it Leaked’s records.

The album opens with Supremacy, an energetic curtain-jerker. Call me a purist, but a rock song that includes the words ‘emancipation’ and ‘policies’ in the lyrics is already toeing the line. What starts here from the very opening track though is a ‘throwing stuff at a wall and seeing what sticks’ mentality that is rife from here on out. Classical strings accompanying the guitars at the start are abolished in favour of trumpets with little to no context or introduction further on in the track.

However, aside from this and the hackneyed military drumbeats, there is the core of a good song here. Matt’s high-pitched vocals are back, there’s some rocking drop tuned guitars, an above par solo: Wonderful, let’s do it!

 

If you had told me before that Muse were writing a song where they ripped off 80s and 90s funk as well as Michael Jackson, while Matt Bellamy ‘Oooh!’’d and Ow!’d about the place, I’d have assumed and prayed you were joking…

 

Madness, the lead single of the album, is a slow song totally devoid the artistic value, instrumental merit, relatable themes and striking lyricism of other Muse ‘slow singles’. Perhaps I’m being harsh, but to me, being mindful of the quality a band is capable of is necessary when looking at new releases. The comparison to Queen is less of an elephant, rather a blue whale wearing high visibility clothing in the room.

The less said about Panic Station, the better. If you had told me before that Muse were writing a song where they ripped off 80s and 90s funk as well as Michael Jackson, while Matt Bellamy ‘Oooh!’’d and Ow!’d about the place, I’d have assumed and prayed you were joking… *Retrospectively adding the U2 B-Side (Yeah, fecking U2, and that’s coming from an Irishman) Big Freeze into songs I refuse to talk at length about.)

On to Survival. OK, we’re actually getting somewhere here. There’s still some inane paint by numbers lyrics, (‘I’m gonna win, Yes I’m gonna win’ anybody?) but some actual progressive rock sneaks in at the end with what proves to be Muse’s go-to and only trick, drop tuned guitars.

The only thing I have written down here for both Follow Me and Explorers is ‘Guiding Light clone’… which is excessively disturbing considering Guiding Light in itself was an Invincible clone. On top of this, Explorers is just inexplicably long…! Almost 6 minutes of drab, castrated and uninspiring material.

Now, there are some good points to the albums, don’t get me wrong. Animals at least builds up some anticipation, a hot instrumental bridge and some actual hard-hitting lyrics as opposed to the soft-core faux-rebellion inciting ‘We are the people’ epitaphs. Matt growls ‘Kill yourself, Come on and do us all a favour’ to the financial and political powers they stand against.

To this point, one could assume that Chris and Dom had been evicted from the band, as bass and drum-lines have been consistently forgettable, taking a backseat to Matt’s exploits. On Save Me, and Liquid State conversely, Chris takes centre stage on vocals to strange results. The songs betray an element of talent unknown of Chris to the masses. His vocals are dreamy, cerebral and heartfelt. Save Me strikes me as the one song I will be returning to listen to, despite it not really going anywhere meaningful. The whole track sounds like a brief refrain, ready to explode, but never actually getting there. Liquid State is guilty of the same sin, with far less emotion invested in it, sounding like a drab mid-album track of Pendulum’s (unflattering comparison #36).

 

Unsustainable, Muse’s foray into brostep. One has to laugh about all the fuss this comparatively short song caused in the build-up to this album’s release.

 

And now the fun starts; Unsustainable, Muse’s foray into brostep. One has to laugh about all the fuss this comparatively short song caused in the build-up to this album’s release. I actually speculate that there was more of this high frequency beat, peeling notes style to be included in the album, but later retracted after initial reactions. This is sad, as it’s one of the few times that Muse actually step outside of a self-imposed box consisting of watered down electro-rock. I may be trying too hard to find the sublime amongst the ridiculous, but this direction is the only thing that got me slightly interested. Dubstep on guitars is now an achievable goal, and if done right, could be the new chapter of progressive rock. It’s just a shame that Muse appeared to give up on it so fast.

And we end with Isolated System, the most pointless song of the album, and bafflingly, the closer.

Overall, this album contains few moments of artistic or musical merit. Muse appear to have forgone well thought out album concepts and instead have strewn together many half-considered ideas, stitched together by laughably conspicuous filler songs, fuelled by the behemoth that is Matt Bellamy’s ego. Experimentation was always key to Muse’s sound, but this appears to just be a ‘leap before you look’ mess, relying on hype and media coverage to sell.

Verdict: 3/10

 

Pre-order the album at Muse official site and discuss the album at our forum.

59 comments
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  • Poadl
    September 24, 2012 at 5:45 pm

    Ridiculous review. Is this p4k?


  • Profile photo of seth
    @seth Level 0
    September 24, 2012 at 6:48 pm

    this is very well written and i agree totally with it. half-baked ideas executed to something completely uninspiring.and to top it all off they are taking themselves so god damn seriously i don’t know how to laugh or cry.


  • Mike Oley
    September 24, 2012 at 7:26 pm

    I knew reviews like this and many others would most likely come from this album. I didn’t want to agree with them, yet sadly I do. I’ve only listened twice through…but it’s too much “Guiding Light” and not enough experimentation for me. And Chris’s songs are just flat out strange. So strange.


  • Edmund
    September 24, 2012 at 8:43 pm

    Could not agree LESS! The album is brilliant! Isolated system is a music symphony filled with tranquility and a touch of technology ( and Supremacy sounds like the next James Bond song :D ). Do not see all the hate towards it!


  • Profile photo of Brandon
    @borno24 Level 1
    September 24, 2012 at 8:49 pm

    has anyone considered experimentation as a good thing? you cant expect every single album to have the same feel, that would get boring. I think what muse is trying to do here is experiment with new ideas and while yes i will agree some songs aren’t the best out there it is overall a good album. I invite you to listen to it a few times before you make judgement and do so with an open mind, appreciating the music and the experimentation that has been tried and not what you think it should be.

    PS I really like the two songs chris did the vocals on.


  • Jacob Stuckey
    September 24, 2012 at 9:15 pm

    I’ve been a Muse fan since I can remember, this release seems completely forgetable. I literally 100% agree with this review, the brostep guitar “demo” we got was possibly the best part of the album. I am sad. I miss Showbiz


  • Mark
    September 24, 2012 at 11:20 pm

    Agreed. I also thought the last album was slipping pretty bad.

    1.James bond attempt. (clearly by the loser outro lick piece by bellamy)
    2. Thought this would be then only experimental song at the point it was released.
    3.Panic station is a load of garbage.
    4.prelude is some disney end scene ripoff.
    5.Survival was made for the Olympics. Really brings me down. At this point I knew the album would suck, gave them a chance.
    6.Follow the money to the dance party sits in the number six spot. I’m speechless with it…..
    7. Animals is like a radiohead song with some henrdix and chilli peppers in there.
    8.walk off a cliff.
    9.Who’s responsible? who produced this?
    10.You taught the bass player to audition for disney movies, neat trick.
    11.This reminds me that queens of the stone age have a new album out this year, bass player sings well here. Good to note the drummer and bass player will have a future in a sum41 cover band,
    12.Nothing should happen here, but some dubstep does, along with some somewhat cool theatrical information which is political. Sounds much more badass comaprative to bellemy raging against puberty.
    13.why end it there. Repeat the theme with less dubstep.

    Cool musics you’ve got there.


  • [email protected]
    September 25, 2012 at 12:02 am

    I don’t hate this album…but i’m not sure how I feel about it. The funny thing for me is my two favorite songs are madness and panic station. The songs are are constructed well and I like them. I think they are the most experimental and they really work for me. The rest of the album sounds like they tried…and failed to capture the sound that has made us love them them for all this time. If the last album didn’t prove they were evolving into a new sound then this one definitely will. At least I can say I added two songs from this album to my muse playlist…and animals may make it once i have listened to ig a few mord times. This is progress considering i have zero from resistance and only two from blackholes.


  • I > U
    September 25, 2012 at 12:48 am

    This guy is a prick, fills me with things you can never penetrate


  • CQ
    September 25, 2012 at 2:47 am

    And now for a slightly unorganized rant about why this article has failed to produce a good review. While I do disagree with the opinion, it really isn’t well written at all, or make any real arguments that are supported, did you ever write anything academically ever?

    First off, you definitely aren’t a lifelong muse fan if you aren’t a fan of their music over the last six years, roughly half of their existence as a band. But I get saying that, it lends legitimacy to your review. I think I’ve read some good reviews by you before, and your writing style is generally good, but you “have strewn together many half-considered ideas.” You haven’t actually thought about the music, you have only reacted to it. You haven’t actually said what you like about Muse’s music besides experimentation and prog-rock sounds but you argued against this in a way by calling yourself a “rock purist” as the bases for not liking the lyrics in supremacy, so I don’t know where you stand on that and it sort of invalidates that bit. General agreement among fans is that Supremacy is the best muse song written since absolution, I would argue Knights of Cydonia, but thats another thing. The whole album is very personal and global at the same time, personalizing global problems, and a host of different emotional reactions to the state of the world. All these different emotions are reflected by the different kinds of styles of each song.
    I would argue that Matt’s style has changed, he is way more into composing and has become more cinematic, the whole album sounds like a soundtrack. You have not discussed the themes in your article which is stupid, how can you talk about music without talking about what it means, unless you just like pop which doesn’t have too much meaning, but why would you review an album so diverse as this if you were just into pop.


    • Profile photo of Austin
      @audiobinge Level 6
      September 25, 2012 at 5:33 am

      Fanboy alert! http://i.imgur.com/PS5oT.gif

      Music means different things to different people. It’s not subjective CQ. You talk about Matt missing the meaning “which is stupid.” Clearly you’re missing the meaning of the second best style of music ever, pop. (Country is obviously first)


    • Profile photo of Matt
      @mattdoyle Level 5
      September 25, 2012 at 8:20 am

      Being a fan of the albums I mentioned since they came out until now equates me to being a lifelong fan, no? Admittedly I wasn’t rocking Showbiz when I was 6, but that’s the point I was going for. Should I be evicted from the Muse fanbase because I have’t blindly liked everything they’ve released so far? I even liked Resistance and BH&R, but not nearly as much as the previous albums.

      I state from the outset that this is ‘my progressing track-by-track thoughts on my listen through of the album’. Of course it’s going to be reactionary. The kind of depth of review you’re looking for apparently doesn’t come 9 hours after the leak has been reported.

      The purist line was a bit of a joke really, but what I do mean is that you can write incendiary songs about rising up against the government and the powers and ‘the man’, but actually make them rebellion-inciting. Not this namby-pamby, whiney kind of way.

      General agreement that Supremacy is their best written song ever? I must have missed that meeting…

      Not to be too dismissive, but the themes of this album and the one before have been pretty clear and consistent to the point that they’re derivative. Chris’s songs do delve more into his battle with alcoholism, etc which I did not go into due to length and time constraints.

      I’m not expecting to change your mind, just putting my initial thoughts on the album across, but I’ll agree that Matt’s style has changed. But not for the better. I would have loved this album to sound like a soundtrack but I can’t get past the obvious mirroring of styles of other acts, Matt’s grossly restrained vocals, shiny bells and whistles used sparsely and just causing a disjointed sound and it just not sounding *good*.

      And you leave my love of pop music out of this! :<

      What sounds good or not is always obviously going to be subjective, and the 2nd Law rarely sounded good to me, for reasons that I’ve hopefully outlined above.

      Do I have to hand in my MUSE card to you now? :(


    • ChewTheDirt
      October 2, 2012 at 2:17 pm

      “would argue that Matt’s style has changed, he is way more into composing and has become more cinematic, the whole album sounds like a soundtrack.”

      Couldn’t agree more – this album is especially dramatic in the sense that it almost wants something visual to coincide with it. Here is a review similar to your comment: http://www.chewthedirt.com/album-week-muse-2nd-law/

      Personally, I loved this album – Yes, Matt’s style has changed, but what artist doesn’t? Muse took a a big step in a right/new direction.


  • Profile photo of Gareth
    @pouppe Level 1
    September 25, 2012 at 3:14 am

    Did you even listen to Isolated System? Have you never listened to a symphonic piece? The meaning comes from the music.

    Matt Bellamy explained that when he wrote it, he pictured Earth — our little speck of chaos — amidst a sea of nothingness. And at the end, the machine powers down. I actually walked away with a strong sense of dread, sadness, but in a good way.


  • gooched
    September 25, 2012 at 7:29 am

    Really ridiculous stuff…another “fan” who measures things by riffs instead of actual music. No you can’t work for p4k no matter how low your scores are. You clearly don’t know much about music for one.


  • Johnny Boy
    September 25, 2012 at 8:57 am

    I thought the review was actually quite kind considering what could have been said. He barely touched on the fact that next to nothing on the album sounds new or original. Almost all of it sounds like something done better by other, better bands previously.

    Supremacy isn’t terrible. But it’s not the second coming either, as many Muse fans seem to have announced when they first heard it. The heavy parts are a poor mans Kashmir and the softer parts sound like a forgotten Bond movie theme.

    Madness manages to sound like Queen, U2, Prince and Depeche Mode all in one sitting. The absolutely abhorrent guitar solo sounds like it was copy pasted from Brian May.

    Panic Station features one of the trumpet players that played on Superstition by Stevie Wonder. The song itself sounds like… wait for it… Superstition by Stevie Wonder. Despite that, it’s one of the few things on the album that sounds new for Muse and is probably the most entertaining thing on the album.

    Prelude is comedy Disney music that would be more acceptable if it didn’t lead into Survival; one of the worst songs Muse have ever released. Musically it’s a mess. Vocally it’s atrocious. And frankly, the lyrics would be better if they weren’t there. Absolute tripe.

    Follow Me is new for Muse but old hat for anyone that’s listened to a radio in the last two or three years. Dance music by numbers with more appalling lyrics.

    Animals is the song that sounds most like the Muse of yesteryear (before they turned into a patchwork quilt covers band). A little Radiohead in parts. It builds and builds and builds and then…. it ends without delivering. This is the musical equivalent of five minutes of heavy petting in the car and then not being invited in “for coffee”.

    Explorers continues the themes of sounding like Queen and dreadful lyrics. This one actually has vocal lines that sound exactly like Don’t Stop Me Now. And it genuinely finishes with the lines “Shhh… Go to sleep” with Bellamy sounding like a drunken, seedy uncle spying on his neice. Turgid guff.

    There’s a phrase about wearing influences on sleeves. Well, if Muse wear their influences on their sleeves, then Big Freeze is Muse tattooing a picture of the members of U2 onto their collective forearms. This song is a Barry Crocker. It couldn’t sound more like U2 if it were actually U2. In fact, I don’t think even U2 sound this much like U2 anymore. Snuff it out with a pillow while it sleeps. Rancid.

    Save Me is one of the few songs on the album that doesn’t sound like another band. It’s got a 90s feel to it, and Chris has quite subtle vocals that work well with the material.

    Liquid State sounds like a Queens of the Stoneage song that never made it past the embryonic stage of development. It feels rushed and unfinished and the vocals lack power.

    Unsustainable is interesting as it actually does something new, but it feels like an intro to something bigger. Sadly, that something bigger never comes, and the track it leads into, Isolated System, is a bit of a damp way to end the record. It sounds like Tubular Bells with a dance beat. Very anticlimactic ending. The album goes out with a whimper. It ends limper than John Inman’s wrist.

    Totally forgettable album. Few decent tracks. But mostly it just sounds like Muse doing poor renditions of other bands and genres. They have no identity anymore. They’re like a covers band who will play songs from all different genres to try and please everyone in the room. Jack of all trades, master of none.

    Begone, foul beast.


  • novemberx2
    September 25, 2012 at 9:23 pm

    It was like U2 and Dubstep had a bastard child. Terrible album the review is spot on.



  • Adam
    September 26, 2012 at 1:36 am

    To be honest, I hated Resistance when it came out too and ended up falling in love. I think the same will happen here. Muse’s music is too complicated to just write off after what, 1-3 days…. Give me a break!!


  • Nick
    September 26, 2012 at 1:46 am

    This review is verging on amateur…have you ever listened to classical music? How can you call the closer baffling and pointless when you don’t even know the reason behind it? Maybe you should find out what the point of the album was, the story, and the themes involved with the album before you declare it pointless.
    Onto other matters, why is it that the only parts of the album you like are the progressive rock, heavy riffs, and surprisingly, the “brostep.” There are so many elements to this album, and by doing this, you have just shown your weakness as a reviewer by judging based on what you like, rather than the music itself. Take some time…rather than think, “why is Muse using elements of 80’s and 90’s funk, along with characteristics of Michael Jackson,” think, “Did they pull it off?” With Panic Station, yes, they are going to piss off a lot of fans, but the fact of the matter is that it actually is a good throwback song, with updated, modern elements. Who cares if it doesn’t sound like Absolution? Listen to the music and review it. Don’t compare and contrast. They moved on. It’s time for the rest of you to, too. Otherwise, keep listening to Absolution, Origin, and Showbiz. Muse wants to target a wider fan base. That is why they put so many elements into this album. Think of it less as a crappy mix of sounds, and more of an album that is accessible to almost any listener. The funny thing is, is that the only people that it won’t be accessible to are old Muse fans.
    Stop pretending like Muse are taking everything so seriously. Do you really think that they wrote Panic Station without laughing their asses off in the practice room? They are a multi-million dollar band. Of course they are going to take themselves seriously. They might have written some cheesy songs, but the fact of the matter is, is that they care about their image. What do you expect them to do, call it shit? Oooh Muse put out a cheesy album, and because they are doing their best to take it seriously, it makes the album even worse! Get off your high horse and examine the album instead of ridiculous things like that.
    Last, but not least, how can you call yourself a good reviewer and complain about the fact that they are using certain lyrics in a rock song. I’m sorry, but who put you in charge of policing lyrics in rock epics? Are we only allowed to write rock songs with lyrics like AC/DC? The lyrics in that song are actually very cinematic to me, especially with the James Bond feel. But the song can’t be good because his lyrics don’t match up with the genre? I could understand an argument for Blues, but really, who the hell cares what people choose to sing about in their songs. Matt Belamy’s lyrics mean a lot to him, and they are very well written most of the time (I’ll give you Survival).
    I agree with some of the points you made (about Explorers being a rip-off of themselves), but if you wanted to make a solid comparison, throw out Guiding Light and just leave Invincible in there, because there are times when it literally sounds like the exact same song. However there is one huge issue I have with your review. It actually comes in the last paragraph. How can you possibly say that “Overall, this album contains few moments of artistic or musical merit”? That is so far off from the truth, and if you try that one out while actually listening to the album, you’ll be forced to admit it was a stupid point. The arrangements on every song are filled with artistic and musical merit. That is an absurd point. You can call the songs bland. You can say you don’t like them. But saying they lack merit is an abomination. The arrangements are actually phenomenally written if you have a musical background.
    The album is my 5th favorite, only above Resistance, so I’m not really the hugest fan of it, but I can’t stand by while this mockery of a review is sitting on the front page…
    I’d give it a 5/10 for mixing it up. And for the musical and artistic merit.


    • Profile photo of Matt
      @mattdoyle Level 5
      September 26, 2012 at 8:56 am

      “This review is verging on amateur…have you ever listened to classical music? How can you call the closer baffling and pointless when you don’t even know the reason behind it? Maybe you should find out what the point of the album was, the story, and the themes involved with the album before you declare it pointless.”

      8 notes repeated again and again for 5 minutes =/= classical music. I would honestly love to see the theme and story you can extract from that song without actually reading it off some fan page, because MB said it was so, which is really not the point of music. I’m not going to get up my own hole and say ‘Hmmm, Isolated System is a fitting closer as I can now sit back to mull over the eerie calm that has befallen this landscape after a Mad Animal Supremacy created an Unsustainable Isolated System populated by those that Survived.’ It’s tedious, too long for what it is and immaterial in terms of the album musically.

      “Take some time…rather than think, “why is Muse using elements of 80′s and 90′s funk, along with characteristics of Michael Jackson,” think, “Did they pull it off?” With Panic Station, yes, they are going to piss off a lot of fans, but the fact of the matter is that it actually is a good throwback song, with updated, modern elements.”

      To me, they did not pull it off… At all… And I really struggle to find any pluses in this song, because everything on it has been done before much better. And it is distinctly hard not to compare and contrast when IT SOUNDS THE EXACT SAME (but worse) AS VERY POPULAR MUSIC THAT CAME BEFORE IT. Am I supposed to applaud Muse because they ‘had a laugh making this’ or managed to put together a trumpet arrangement?

      “Muse wants to target a wider fan base. That is why they put so many elements into this album. Think of it less as a crappy mix of sounds, and more of an album that is accessible to almost any listener. The funny thing is, is that the only people that it won’t be accessible to are old Muse fans.”

      I’m sorry, but that’s bullshit to me. What Muse seem to be doing, and what you seem to be going along with is a constant exchange ‘Hey, let’s put some strings in’ ‘OMG, I love classical music, this is so accessible to me now’ ‘Let’s rip off U2′ ‘I love U2!! This is so accessible to me now’. And again, I’m not buying it. All you’re doing is validating my ‘throw enough shit at the wall and some of it will stick’ shtick.

      “Last, but not least, how can you call yourself a good reviewer and complain about the fact that they are using certain lyrics in a rock song. I’m sorry, but who put you in charge of policing lyrics in rock epics? Are we only allowed to write rock songs with lyrics like AC/DC? The lyrics in that song are actually very cinematic to me, especially with the James Bond feel. But the song can’t be good because his lyrics don’t match up with the genre? I could understand an argument for Blues, but really, who the hell cares what people choose to sing about in their songs. Matt Belamy’s lyrics mean a lot to him, and they are very well written most of the time (I’ll give you Survival).”

      My points on lyrics are extremely minimal, one of which you agree with and the other is a tongue in cheek comment that saying the words ‘emancipation’ and ‘policies’ aren’t exactly rock n roll (which is true). I don’t even know where you’re coming from, because Muse have never really had good lyrics, come on… Huge fan and all, but they’ve never done anything groundbreaking lyricswise. But ‘i can’t stand by’ while all they sing about is this New World Order and rebellion shite.

      The fact that I can pretty much listen to every song pull out entire progressions, sounds, styles and compare it extremely favourably to other, more popular acts, from wide ranging genres and eras, does not speak for the artistic and musical merit of this album. You can dig and dig and dig for the good arrangements (if you get through the poor sound mixing on this album, which I didn’t even get to in my review), but when the more obvious and gratings foibles are right there, it’s hard to ignore.

      At the end of the day, sorry to burst your bubble, I’m not a professional reviewer. I’m just a guy, who listened to this album, didn’t like it, found objective reasons for disliking it, and posted them up here. And according to the majority of people I’ve seen here and elsewhere, it’s mostly agreed upon. I’m sorry I disturbed your musical background and all your classical music listening so much you had to post that.


      • Profile photo of Austin
        @audiobinge Level 6
        September 26, 2012 at 5:17 pm

        Matt Doyle: 1 Random Internet Dwellers: 0


        • Nick
          September 26, 2012 at 11:58 pm

          Who does Muse copy that is bigger? Queen, Michael Jackson, U2. Who else? You said you have one for the whole album. I doubt it. I wasn’t trying to say that you were wrong about how good the album is. I was merely pointing out that your review should be more focused on actual issues. Great, you point out the sound mixing. But that wasn’t even in your review. I disagree with what you said about the album lacking musical merit, and I disagree with your breakdowns of each song. I’m not a classical listener, but I have been involved in symphonic bands throughout my life, and have tried to compose pieces before, so I know the struggles in writing an arrangement for several members, and I don’t agree that they just “threw on some strings.” If you read about Muse’s last album, you would actually know that Matt Bellamy took ten years to compose his Exogenesis symphony. It’s a lot more troubling than you might think. As a percussionist and drummer, I don’t understand why you called the so called military beats “hack-neyed.” Can you explain that so that I know what you mean? That was my favorite part of the entire album, so seeing you rip it apart with an illogical argument was tough. I saw the last track as a post rock outro. It was sort-of spacey and cool. I love it when the outros are slow and long. I thought it was a cool way to end kind of a chaotic mess of an album. Bands change…they can’t continue to write the same music over and over like RHCP. I like that Muse consistently sounds different, but I don’t actually like most of the songs. So we agree for the most part, but maybe try listening to each song open mindedly before judging the album. I could tell that you were trying to find fault, rather than listening, because you tore apart the beginning of Supremacy, which is pretty cool. And pretty accessible for most Muse fans. I just found that strange, especially since the song is widely appreciated my Muse fans right now.


  • CheshireKat
    September 26, 2012 at 8:51 am

    I actually, among a lot of negative comments and bad ratings, really love this album <3


  • display
    September 26, 2012 at 12:14 pm

    I really love this album. However “big freeze” and “panic station” are not rock songs. Also i think that i have a lot of talent and they have made many tubes on this album: “Follow me” is electro and rock. The melody is awesome. Some parts are like “i will survive”. “Supremacy” is a rock James Bond theme and it’s very good! Liquid state would be better if it would be sung by Matt. I really love “isolated” because it’s trance!!! “Explorers” and “animals” are amazing… “Survival” is as good as “unsustainable”, very melodic. So i think it’s a good album. Madness is too much minimalist for me and “panic station” too much funky. They don’t have done their run! Muse is always Muse!


  • display
    September 26, 2012 at 2:49 pm

    Muse the 2nd law has been leaked in FLAC. Yes i have this one! Better!


  • Profile photo of Tony Hutchison
    @huch108 Level 1
    September 27, 2012 at 10:45 pm

    i know there are a lot of disagreements to this and im not trying to convince anyone of anything. but Panic Station (to me) is incredible. Thats probably because funk is my favorite genre though.


  • Ex-Muse Fan
    September 29, 2012 at 12:17 am

    This review was spot on. This album sucks… Muse needs to become a little less ego-centric and a lot less obsessed with New World orders and Queen. Maybe they should listen to The Bends again and be more like old Muse. Radiohead-inspired Muse >> Queen-inspired Muse.

    Muse WAS my favorite band. Matthew Bellamy WAS my musical hero. He has (or, used to have) amazing compositional skills, vocal ability, and guitar playing.

    They made 4 great albums (Showbiz, Origin of Symmetry, Absolution, and Black Holes & Revelations). Then they sold out to Twilight. They made The Resistance. Whatever – they were enjoying their increased fame and weren’t THAT bad… but with The 2nd Law, I’m afraid they are dead to me. This is just “Madness.”


  • Profile photo of Chris
    @chrisd6 Level 3
    September 29, 2012 at 3:40 am

    Really harsh on it. I liked the album.


  • Alex
    October 1, 2012 at 3:24 am

    Well this is review is pointless. How can you review an album? Everyone has their own taste, and their own opinion. Just because you wrote a review, it doesn’t mean the album is actually bad. I can say that I don’t like Bon Jovi. I didn’t say that Bon Jovi was bad, I just don’t like his music. You just said “THE 2ND LAW SUCKS”. I like this website, but the reviews are ridiculous.


  • ChewTheDirt
    October 2, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    I am normally pretty critical but this album is one of the best I’ve ever heard. Period. Famed Music Critic agrees http://www.chewthedirt.com/album-week-muse-2nd-law/ . Absolute game changer for Muse….Phenomenal


  • ChewTheDirt
    October 2, 2012 at 1:58 pm

    How can you possibly call yourself a Muse fan and have the nerve to sit there and rip apart such a flawless album. Do you have ears? The production alone is enough to make you want to come back for more!

    Here is a review that actually sums up the album in a positive way : http://www.chewthedirt.com/album-week-muse-2nd-law/

    If your going to review something, take the time to really pick apart each song, rather then throwing up some biased remarks. If your a Muse fan, you will listen again. This album is a masterpiece. Not too heavy and no radio hits – they tried something new and absolutely succeeded.


    • Profile photo of Matt
      @mattdoyle Level 5
      October 2, 2012 at 6:54 pm

      I really don’t understand your point…? If I’m a fan of Muse, why is it completely unheard of for me to dislike something that sounds completely far removed and unlike that band? Surely that only follows common sense?

      Music isn’t about picking a side and following that band relentlessly and feverishly eating up and loving everything they release…

      They way you go on, it sounds like if Matt Bellamy farted into a mic and made it a B-side you’d be on it.


  • Profile photo of feelgoodlost [Moderator]
    October 2, 2012 at 9:14 pm

    So I haven’t ever listened to Muse and nothing will change that trend. I can say that hating on someone’s opinion is pointless. Rather than attack his work, man (or lady) up and write your own.

    Also from some of the reaction the songs have concepts that have been gleamed from interviews with the band members; if you listen to a song without the preconception and don’t get the concept then that is a failure of the band to communicate with the listener. This is not f###ing Ulysses, it shouldn’t require a reading companion.

    To the point, if the music should have accompanying visuals then a band should have enough talent to achieve such a feat.

    Finally, good job Matt for expressing your opinion and preempting your review with the context that this review is in a sense a work in progress which I respect and not enough reviewers acknowledge.


  • Morgan
    October 3, 2012 at 12:33 am

    Spot on review. Don’t listen to anyone who tells you otherwise. I had to go back and listen to Origin of Symmetry and Absolution in order to survive this cd.


    • Profile photo of Niall Harrison
      @nialzzz Level 0
      October 4, 2012 at 10:29 am

      At what point did you move back to the earlier albums? During the listening of “The 2nd Law” or after? The former would indicate you interrupted the flow of the album, thus automatically ruining any “flow”. The latter, well, this would render your comment fairly redundant; listening to an earlier album after this would confirm that you had already got through it.

      In conclusion, your comment is completely nonsensical.


  • Profile photo of Niall Harrison
    @nialzzz Level 0
    October 4, 2012 at 10:23 am

    This review is massively sub par. Why waste time formulating such a misguided and misleading column?


    • Profile photo of feelgoodlost [Moderator]
      October 4, 2012 at 3:33 pm

      Yeah because OPINIONS are misleading. It is an opinion and if you can’t come to grips with someone’s OPINION not agreeing with yours then why bother with a response. Write your own and post it in the forum.

      ^see what I did there with opinion, i capitalized it so as to reinforce both its denotations and connotations. An opinion can not be misleading based purely on its meaning.


      • Profile photo of Niall Harrison
        @nialzzz Level 0
        October 8, 2012 at 12:04 am

        When the opinion is put forward, that is completely acceptable. To put forward an opinion and attempt to add substance to the aforementioned “opinion” with fairly lacklustre attempt, then it is plausible to refute.

        It is not the content I object to, but the ability of the writer. This being something I don’t have to emphasise with capital letters. Also, the capitalisation of the word opinion confirms your inability to use a keyboard correctly. The mere context alone is enough to interpret the ideal.

        In summation, the review is misleading as it is not only badly written, but an inaccurate depiction of the material based on the release date of the review -with relation to the time of leak.

        Feelgoodlost; does that alleviate any quarrel you have with my previous comment? I surely hope so…


  • Profile photo of Tom
    @tsswnhs Level 3
    October 4, 2012 at 3:05 pm

    Sadly, I agree. I really like Animals, though. Ah well, I can always put on some Origin or Absolution when I want to listen to the good ole Muse.


  • Danny
    October 7, 2012 at 5:36 pm

    I enjoy how people say this is a well written review despite the reviewer refusing to critique Big Freeze and only refers to Explorers and Follow Me as the ‘Guiding Light’ clone.

    A terribly written review by, probably, a Muse fan who isn’t happy they didn’t try to re-create Origin of Symmetry.


  • L21
    October 9, 2012 at 11:04 pm

    Awful review. It just sounds like another butt-hurt Muse fan who couldn’t enjoy anything other than Origin/Absolution. I don’t like it either, actually. Am I going to cry about it by defacing the band/album without some substantial reasoning? No.

    I can still appreciate what they tried to do, but it isn’t my cup of tea.

    Everyone has an opinion, but stupid people shouldn’t be able to voice theirs, especially while acting like they actually know a thing or two about music.

    Oh, and FYI, Muse have always ‘ripped off’ people since Showbiz. Matt Bellamy – “You can either expand upon something already done, or create something new” – they did both this album, and ALL their albums.

    Please, ask me what comparisons I can make up (song-by-song) for each of their first three albums. It’s no different than this, lazy writing.


  • Long term Muse fan
    January 10, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Non-newb Muse fans have followed Muse mainly for their propensity for powerful alternative rock.

    This and album and the previous are such a deviation from what made Muse great it saddens me.

    The albums reflect Matt’s attitude towards life. Up until and including Black Holes and Revelations, Matt was anxious, more conspiratorial and discontent. As soon as he found solace romantically and familiarly, the albums changed. He softened, the music became subjective, selfish and weaker overall.

    I’m very disappointing by what Muse have become. I understand that the lyrics are still a geopolitical commentary and endeavor to propagate love rather the negativity but Bellamy has forgotten that the negativity in the band’s prior work was the fundamental inertia requisite for catalyzing the very revolution of consciosness that they once were effective at catlyzing.

    Muse have sold out commercially and spiritually.

    If what I’m conveying sound alien to anyone, you need to apreciate that Matt is a conspiracy theorist at heart. His lyrics explicitly reflects this. Though he’s a geoist, he fears centralize globalism and the hidden oligarchical hand orchestrates it.

    Don’t believe me? Listen to Explorers. He’s conceded and sold out. Even the fact that he pandered to something as occult as the Olympics corroborates this.

    This album may indeed be a pleasant experience for new Muse fans but truth be told, the album is more of a series of shadows of the true essence of Muse. It’s a sad case of “fixing” something that wasn’t broken.

    Each of the album’s songs are so anti-climatic that I’m left pondering when the aggressive omnipotent rock is about to kick in and even when it does, it’s painfully understated and brief.

    Make it right Muse. Return to what made you known in the first place. You were already innovating. To continue innovating beyond the point of your artistic peak is naturally, tantamount to artistic deterioration.


  • Long term Muse fan
    January 10, 2013 at 10:57 pm

    I didn’t proof my comment. Apologies for the ridiculous and replete errors.


  • Long term Muse fan
    January 10, 2013 at 11:03 pm

    Two more things to add:

    1) The Muse fans attacking the reviewer are resorting to ad hominem attacks. This completely invalidates your arguments. Attack the message rather than the messenger.
    2) Please implement a “subscribe to comments” feature. It’s a standard expectation especially for any website with a WordPress engine.


  • Profile photo of Dayton
    @dlr1124 Level 2
    April 11, 2013 at 6:31 am

    I’ve loved literally everything from Muse, Shobiz to 2nd Law.


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